Lemon Bakewell Tart

lemon bakewell tart

Lemon Bakewell Tart; crisp shortcrust pastry topped with tangy lemon curd and a sweet lemon frangipane (that’s a posh name for almond-based cake!) Classics are always good, but this citrus twist on a traditional Bakewell tart is a real winner!

lemon bakewell tart

I have to admit, up until about two years ago, I hated all things lemon. I know. I’m sorry.

I don’t even know why, it’s just a flavour I really didn’t like, but thankfully my tastebuds have grown to love the citrus tang.

Since Spring is (technically) upon us, I thought I’d churn out the first sunny bake of the year for you all, something a little less nutty or spice heavy, we all get very fond of stodge over the Winter don’t we? That is 100% not a complaint by the way.

This Lemon Bakewell Tart is a fun spin on the traditional version, usually made with jam and almond-flavoured frangipane. (Frangipane is just kind of a posh name for a cake made with ground almonds by the way!) This version replaces the jam with a layer of tangy lemon curd, and replaces the almond frangipane with a fresh, zesty lemon-flavoured kind instead. Yum! It was inspired by a recipe I saw recently on Pinterest, but naturally, I had to make it my own!

 This tart is a great alternative to the usual lemon drizzle cakes or lemon fairy cakes that tend to pop up in the springtime, and would make a great Easter dessert if you get sick of all that chocolate before Easter Sunday actually arrives! I know I’ll be making it again very soon, my poor mum has given up sweet treats and crisps for lent so she didn’t get a chance to taste it, even though shortcrust pastry is one of her favourite things. My ever-hungry workmates devoured most of it instead, they never disappoint.

lemon bakewell tart

I thought about filming myself making this recipe to post on my YouTube channel, but the thought of you guys watching me try to zest 4 lemons without grating my thumb in the process was just too much pressure. Sorry, I guess?

Anyway, enough rambling, time to make this Lemon Bakewell Tart! This recipe looks long and complicated but I really only used so many instructions to make it straightforward for you, so many recipes expect people to know what they’re doing when often they might not! I promise it isn’t as scary or difficult as it looks.

By the way, it’s completely ok to use shop-bought pastry and shop-bought lemon curd in this recipe, no one will judge you! If you’d like to make your own lemon curd, try out this recipe that I use to make a small batch, perfect for this recipe!

To start, you’ll need to make the shortcrust pastry. If you’re using shop bought, read ahead a few steps!

In either a food processor or a large bowl, measure out some flour, sugar and butter.

If using your hands, use a knife to stir and chop the butter into little pea-sized pieces, before using your fingers and thumbs to rub the butter into the flour completely. The mixture should look like fine breadcrumbs. If using a food processor, simply blitz until you achieve the consistency of fine breadcrumbs.

Add some water a little at a time until the mixture comes together into a dough.

Knead very gently and form the dough into a round thick disc.

Wrap the pastry dough disc in clingfilm or pop it into a plastic bag and chill it in the fridge for 20 minutes. This helps firm up the dough, making it easier to roll out!

Once chilled, look out a 20-25cm tart tin or pie dish.

Gently flour your worktop, and use a rolling pin or a big wine bottle to roll the pastry out until it is just thinner than a pound coin (about 1cm) and wide enough to cover your tin with a little over-hang.

To get the pastry into your tin/dish you can use one of two methods.

Method 1: Roll all of the flattened pastry around your rolling pin, lift it over the tin/dish and unroll it to cover the whole tin/dish with some over-hanging edges. (this is the method I usually use!)

Method 2: Fold the edges of your pastry into the centre, in a sort of neat bundle, and gently lift this with your hands or the loose-base of your tin into your tin/dish.

 

Once the pastry is in your tin/dish, gently press it flat against the base, and neatly as you can into all the sides and edges.

Roll your rolling pin over the top of the tin/dish to help cut off those over-hanging edges. You can use this excess pastry for whatever you like! I sometimes use it to make mini jam tarts!

Prick your pastry all over the base with a fork, this helps prevent it from rising in the oven.

Pop the tin/dish of pastry back into the fridge to chill for a further 20 minutes. This helps prevent the pastry from shrinking in the oven, and also helps make sure it will be nice and crisp and flaky!

Meanwhile, preheat your oven – 190 degrees for conventional ovens or 170 degrees for fan ovens.

Once chilled, take the tin/dish of pastry out of the fridge.

Scrumple up a piece of greaseproof or parchment paper into a ball, and then unravel it, and place it over your pastry.

Fill this paper cover with either some dry pasta, rice, beans or some ceramic baking beads. None of these should touch the pastry, the paper should act as a liner between the dry filling and the pastry. Because I bake a lot, I use the ceramic beads, but I’ve used rice effectively in the past!

Pop this filled pastry case into the oven and bake for 15 minutes. This is known as “blind-baking.” It helps ensure the base of the pastry cooks through, with the dry filling keep it flat and in the right shape. All very fiddly, I know, but it’s worth it!

Once baked, remove the tin/dish from the oven, leaving the oven on. Gently lift out the paper and discard it, discarding the dry contents or keeping them for other use if you like.

At this stage, the pastry will look under-baked and slightly damp, this is normal!

Allow this to cool in the tin/dish slightly while you make your filling and topping.

To make the lemon filling and frangipane topping you’ll need to start by beating some butter and sugar together in a large bowl until they become paler in colour and noticeably fluffier. You can do this with a wooden spoon or an electric whisk if you have one.

Beat two eggs in, one at a time, until combined.

Stir in some ground almonds, flour, lemon zest and lemon juice until you have a fairly smooth incorporated cake mixture. Set this aside briefly.

Spread some shop-bought or homemade lemon curd, using more or less if you like, all over the bottom of your part-baked pastry case.

On top of this, dollop the frangipane mixture that you just made and spread it gently and evenly over the lemon curd to cover it.

Bake this in the oven at the same temperature for 15-20 minutes until the frangipane topping is firm, risen slightly, and a skewer inserted into the centre of it can be pulled out cleanly.

Once baked, allow the Lemon Bakewell Tart to cool completely in its tin,

When it has cooled completely, you can either dust over some icing sugar, or mix the sugar with some water to make a nice drizzly icing!

Then simply slice and serve!

I really hope you get a chance to try out this Lemon Bakewell Tart, it’s truly a very good dessert or tea-time treat, and is very rewarding for a little extra effort! The crisp buttery pastry, tangy lemon curd and soft zesty frangipane topping are just delicious!

If you do make it, or you manage to convince someone else to make it for you, let me know!

 

As always, feel free to follow me on all my various social media accounts to see what I get up to inside and outside of the kitchen, and I’ll see you very soon for more recipes, reviews, thoughts and more sugary silliness. Have a great week!

 

Lemon Bakewell Tart

Prep Time: 40 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Yield: 8-12 slices

Lemon Bakewell Tart

Lemon Bakewell Tart; crisp shortcrust pastry topped with tangy lemon curd and a sweet lemon frangipane (that’s a posh name for almond-based cake!) Classics are always good, but this citrus twist on a traditional Bakewell tart is a real winner!

Ingredients

    For the sweet shortcrust pastry:
  • 200g plain flour
  • 125g cold, hard butter
  • 2 tbsp icing or caster sugar
  • 1-2 tbsp cold water
    For the lemon filling and topping:
  • 100g soft butter
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 85g ground almonds
  • 35g plain flour
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 4-5 tbsp lemon curd (shop-bought or homemade are both fine!)
  • Icing sugar to decorate (optional)

Instructions

    For the shortcrust pastry:
  1. Either in a food processor or a large bowl, measure out your flour, sugar and butter.
  2. If using your hands, use a knife to stir and chop the butter into little pea-sized pieces, before using your fingers and thumbs to rub the butter into the flour completely. The mixture should look like fine breadcrumbs. If using a food processor, simply blitz until you achieve the consistency of fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Add the water a tbsp at a time until the mixture comes together into a dough.
  4. Knead very gently and form the dough into a round thick disc.
  5. Wrap the pastry dough disc in clingfilm or pop it into a plastic bag and chill it in the fridge for 20 minutes. This helps firm up the dough, making it easier to roll out!
  6. Once chilled, look out a 20-25cm tart tin or pie dish.
  7. Gently flour your worktop, and use a rolling pin or a big wine bottle to roll the pastry out until it is just thinner than a pound coin (about 1cm) and wide enough to cover your tin with a little over-hang.
  8. To get the pastry into your tin/dish you can use one of two methods. Method 1: Roll all of the flattened pastry around your rolling pin, lift it over the tin/dish and unroll it to cover the whole tin/dish with some over-hanging edges. Method 2: Fold the edges of your pastry into the centre, in a sort of neat bundle, and gently lift this with your hands or the loose-base of your tin into your tin/dish.
  9. Once the pastry is in your tin/dish, gently press it flat against the base, and neatly as you can into all the sides and edges.
  10. Roll your rolling pin over the top of the tin/dish to help cut off those over-hanging edges. You can use this excess pastry for whatever you like! I sometimes use it to make mini jam tarts!
  11. Prick your pastry all over the base with a fork, this helps prevent it from rising in the oven.
  12. Pop the tin/dish of pastry back into the fridge to chill for a further 20 minutes. This helps prevent the pastry from shrinking in the oven, and also helps make sure it will be nice and crisp and flaky!
  13. Meanwhile, preheat your oven – 190 degrees for conventional ovens or 170 degrees for fan ovens.
  14. Once chilled, take the tin/dish of pastry out of the fridge.
  15. Scrumple a piece of greaseproof or parchment paper into a ball, and then unravel it, and place it over your pastry. (See pictures for better view)
  16. Fill this paper cover with either some dry pasta, rice, beans or some ceramic baking beads. None of these should touch the pastry, the paper should act as a liner between the dry filling and the pastry.
  17. Pop this filled pastry case into the oven and bake for 15 minutes. This is known as “blind-baking.” It helps ensure the base of the pastry cooks through, with the dry filling keep it flat and in the right shape. All very fiddly, I know, but it’s worth it!
  18. Once baked, remove the tin/dish from the oven, leaving the oven on. Gently lift out the paper and discard it, discarding the dry contents or keeping them for other use if you like.
  19. At this stage, the pastry will look under-baked and slightly damp, this is normal!
  20. Allow this to cool in the tin/dish slightly while you make your filling and topping.
    For the lemon filling and topping:
  1. In a large bowl, beat your butter and sugar together until they become paler in colour and noticeably fluffier.
  2. Beat the two eggs in, one at a time, until combined.
  3. Stir in the ground almonds, flour, lemon zest and lemon juice until you have a fairly smooth incorporated cake mixture. Set this aside briefly.
  4. Spread the lemon curd, using more or less if you like, all over the bottom of your part-baked pastry case.
  5. On top of this, dollop the frangipane mixture that you just made and spread it gently and evenly over the lemon curd to cover it.
  6. Bake this in the oven at the same temperature for 15-20 minutes until the frangipane topping is firm, risen slightly, and a skewer inserted into the centre of it can be pulled out cleanly.
  7. Once baked, allow the Lemon Bakewell Tart to cool completely in its tin.
  8. When cooled, remove it gently from its tin and either dust with some icing sugar, or mix the icing sugar with some water to make a nice drizzly icing!
  9. Slice, serve and enjoy!

*Why not try this out with orange, lime, or grapefruit?

http://maverickbaking.com/lemon-bakewell-tart/

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